Seared Sea Bass with Cauliflower “Rice” Pilaf and Turmeric Plum Sauce

Healthy Food Index Calories MACs Polyphenols Omega-3 FA/Total Fats
1.62 378 5.3 0.08 0.03

(Listed amounts are per serving. MACs = Microbe Accessible Carbohydrates. Amounts of MACs, total polyphenols and phenolic compounds are shown in g for all recipes.)

Introduction

This is an ultra-healthy meal with some big flavors that make it feel really decadent. We went with sea bass for the protein in this recipe, primarily due to its omega-3 fat content (it boasts 0.47 grams docosahexaenoic acid, DHA, and 0.18 grams eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA, per 3 ounce serving). If you want to further increase the omega-3 intake, you can also use wild caught salmon. We kept preparation simple, yet elegant, with a gentle sear of our fish in olive oil and seasoned with sea salt and pepper.

Rice is delicious, however, white rice falls short as far as fiber and polyphenols are concerned. Therefore, this “rice” is made from high fiber, high polyphenol cauliflower! You may have heard about cauliflower rice before, but if you haven’t: welcome to the new white rice swap! To make it even better for your gut health (and to go beyond the standard, plain cauliflower rice), this “rice” has been transformed into a “polyphenol-pilaf” with the addition of olive oil, red onion, garlic, nigella seeds, carrots, artichoke hearts, kale, and fresh herbs.

To complete this dish, we encourage you to make the homemade plum sauce to go with it instead of using a store-bought variety. It is a perfect complement to the sea bass and “rice,” and has no added sugar but boasts a lot of added polyphenols from the ginger, plums, chilis, and tamari. You can use any stone fruit instead of plums during Summer, and in the winter, apples or Asian pears are a great high fiber alternative to plums. Use this sauce liberally in this dish or for any of your stir-fry needs!


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