Walnut Dukkah-Crusted Salmon with Lemony Kale

Walnut Dukkah-Crusted Salmon with Lemony Kale Healthy Food Index Calories MACs Polyphenols Omega-3 FA/Total Fats 3.5 264 2.8 0.04 0.32 (Listed amounts are per serving. MACs = Microbe Accessible Carbohydrates. Amounts of MACs, total polyphenols and phenolic compounds are shown in g for all recipes.) Introduction Dukkah is a traditional Egyptian nut, seed and spice blend that is oh-so-good and good for you. Once you try it, you will see why it has been so easy for us to fall in love with. It typically contains hazelnuts, but we wanted to load it with more omega-3 fats so opted for walnuts (which deliver a whopping 3.4 grams of alpha-linolenic acid, ALA, per cup) instead. Dukkah is typically served as a dip with bread and olive oil (which you can absolutely do with this one, too; dip your bread in olive oil first, and then in the dukkah). This dukkah, however, has been used as a decadent crust for salmon (or your fish of choice, please read our notes, below). Wild caught salmon is incredibly high in the omega-3 fats docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and these make this recipe a true omega-3 dream dish! Polyphenols in this recipe are found primarily in the cumin, fennel, and coriander as well as the extra virgin olive oil. In terms of fiber, there is some in the walnuts and sesame seeds. But it really comes in strong with the side dish that this salmon is paired with: lemony kale. Kale is one of the most nutrient dense foods on the planet because it is high in fiber, many vitamins and minerals, and other phytonutrients (plant nutrients). Please keep in mind that many of kale’s (and other vegetables’) nutrients, such as polyphenols, are soluble in water and sensitive to heat. Therefore, sautéing is one of the best ways to retain these important nutrients because this cooking method is quick and doesn't cause nutrients to leech out in water or in high amounts of oil. Besides the kale’s hefty fiber and polyphenol content, this simple side dish also delivers even more polyphenols in the garlic and lemon.

Seared Sea Bass with Cauliflower “Rice” Pilaf and Turmeric Plum Sauce

Seared Sea Bass with Cauliflower “Rice” Pilaf and Turmeric Plum Sauce Healthy Food Index Calories MACs Polyphenols Omega-3 FA/Total Fats 1.62 378 5.3 0.08 0.03 (Listed amounts are per serving. MACs = Microbe Accessible Carbohydrates. Amounts of MACs, total polyphenols and phenolic compounds are shown in g for all recipes.) Introduction This is an ultra-healthy meal with some big flavors that make it feel really decadent. We went with sea bass for the protein in this recipe, primarily due to its omega-3 fat content (it boasts 0.47 grams docosahexaenoic acid, DHA, and 0.18 grams eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA, per 3 ounce serving). If you want to further increase the omega-3 intake, you can also use wild caught salmon. We kept preparation simple, yet elegant, with a gentle sear of our fish in olive oil and seasoned with sea salt and pepper. Rice is delicious, however, white rice falls short as far as fiber and polyphenols are concerned. Therefore, this “rice” is made from high fiber, high polyphenol cauliflower! You may have heard about cauliflower rice before, but if you haven’t: welcome to the new white rice swap! To make it even better for your gut health (and to go beyond the standard, plain cauliflower rice), this “rice” has been transformed into a “polyphenol-pilaf” with the addition of olive oil, red onion, garlic, nigella seeds, carrots, artichoke hearts, kale, and fresh herbs. To complete this dish, we encourage you to make the homemade plum sauce to go with it instead of using a store-bought variety. It is a perfect complement to the sea bass and “rice,” and has no added sugar but boasts a lot of added polyphenols from the ginger, plums, chilis, and tamari. You can use any stone fruit instead of plums during Summer, and in the winter, apples or Asian pears are a great high fiber alternative to plums. Use this sauce liberally in this dish or for any of your stir-fry needs!

Spaghetti al Funghi (Spaghetti Squash with Mushrooms)

Spaghetti al Funghi (Spaghetti Squash with Mushrooms) Healthy Food Index Calories MACs Polyphenols Omega-3 FA/Total Fats 2.18 268 5.9 0.07 0.013 (Listed amounts are per serving. MACs = Microbe Accessible Carbohydrates. Amounts of MACs, total polyphenols and phenolic compounds are shown in g for all recipes.) Introduction This spaghetti dish is another exciting alternative to whole wheat and bean derived pasta. Taking advantage of the unique texture of spaghetti squash, you can enjoy this dish without any worries about its glycemic index, and at the same time load up on fiber and carotene B. In addition, we have added multiple sources of polyphenols and fiber, including mushrooms, broccoli, pumpkin seeds, ginger, gloves and pepper.

Pasta del Frutta di Mare (Seafood Pasta)

Pasta del Frutta di Mare (Seafood Pasta) Healthy Food Index Calories MACs Polyphenols Omega-3 FA/Total Fats 2.63 354.5 8.7 0.017 0.062 (Listed amounts are per serving. MACs = Microbe Accessible Carbohydrates. Amounts of MACs, total polyphenols and phenolic compounds are shown in g for all recipes.) Introduction Like most pasta dishes, this one is easy to make and tastes simply delicious. But wait until you hear about the health promoting ingredients: whole wheat or bean derived pasta with a low glycemic index, several sources of omega-3 fatty acids, polyphenols from various plants, spices and herbs. When served with one of the salads, a perfect dinner dish.

Cauliflower Fettuccine Alfredo with Homemade Cashew Cheese

Cauliflower Fettuccine Alfredo with Homemade Cashew Cheese Healthy Food Index Calories MACs Polyphenols Omega-3 FA/Total Fats 2.06 478 10.7 0.03 0.004 (Listed amounts are per serving. MACs = Microbe Accessible Carbohydrates. Amounts of MACs, total polyphenols and phenolic compounds are shown in g for all recipes.) Introduction Even though this comfort food dish is 100% plant-based, you’ll feel like you’re having cream and cheese. It is loaded with MACs from whole grain pasta, cauliflower and peas. This pasta is also chock full of polyphenols. Olive oil has a high amount of polyphenols and also provides us with healthy fats: the predominant fatty acid (about 73%) is a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid, and it also contains some omega-3. Nuts are also a great source of polyphenols and monounsaturated fatty acids. Cashews were the winning choice for this fettuccine Alfredo because they have a lower overall fat content than most other nuts, and because 82% of their fats are health promoting unsaturated ones (and 66% of these are monounsaturated, like those found in olive oil). Plus, they contain a little omega-3, too. They also lend a nice opportunity to teach you how to make your own cashew cheese at home because while store-bought cashew cheeses can be so tasty, they can be really expensive. For a hefty dose of omega-3 fatty acids in this dish, sprinkle raw hemp hearts on your pasta - it'll add some fun texture to this dish.